Eggs are amazing. Here’s why

eggs-benedict

Eggs benedict start the day off right! recipe

Humans have been eating eggs ever since they discovered that eggs were good and good for them.

Then, maybe about 4,000 years ago, human beings began to domesticate wildfowl and eliminated the need to go out into the jungle and steal eggs from nests. The most popular egg comes from the descendant of the red jungle fowl. Of course, they’re the eggs of the chicken.

Eggs are readily bought in supermarkets, but a person is lucky to have their very own chickens in the backyard that can provide absolutely fresh eggs. Different breeds of hen have different production rates, but a leghorn is renown for its productivity. A single leghorn hen can lay as many as 300 eggs per year. By the way, hens don’t need roosters to lay eggs. Eggs can be white, brown, blue, green or even purple.

Besides their great nutritional value, eggs can be prepared in all kinds of ways. They can be soft boiled, hard boiled, poached, shirred, fried or scrambled. They can be made into omelets and frittattas and can be the basis for sauces like Hollandaise sauce and condiments like mayonnaise. They can even be used in alcoholic drinks like flips and nonalcoholic drinks like eggnog. Custards wouldn’t be custard without eggs. Can I get an amen?

The nutrients in eggs make it a nearly perfect food. It’s true that it might be a bit high in cholesterol, but a person can regulate their egg consumption if they’re worried about it. One egg provides 26.5 percent of the daily recommended allowance of choline, which, interestingly, regulates the way the body uses cholesterol. Choline makes sure that fat doesn’t accumulate in the liver while making sure it still gets into the cells of the body. Because of this, choline is crucial for the health of the liver and kidneys. An egg is also high in selenium, iodine, Vitamin B2, protein, phosphorus, Vitamin B5 and Vitamin D.

In the United States, eggs are graded by the Department of Agriculture. They’re either AA, A or B (AA is the best). As most shoppers know, they’re also classified according to size. However, it’s not necessary for eggs to be inspected by the government and a person can buy eggs from just about anyone, including the neighbor who has a chicken coop or a farmer at a farmer’s market. In that case, it’s a good idea to get to know your egg seller. However a person gets their eggs, they should be stored in the fridge if they’re not used right away. The best place to keep eggs isn’t the egg tray but the carton. Eggs should stay fresh for a month or so in the refrigerator.

Looking for fun recipes using your eggs, or want to reinvigorate your love of the ova? Check these out: Egg recipes 

What are your favorite ways to enjoy eggs? Share in the comments below!

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Comments

  1. I have never been much of an egg person, but ate them just because I thought I should. I changed to an egg lover after recently finding a nice little old lady who sells lovely fresh free-range organic eggs. Because they taste so much better, a simple fried egg in coconut oil has become my staple fast-food. Of course deviled eggs and frittatas are always a hit. As you have brought out, eggs are so versitile and last for quite awhile, they are the single person’s friend!

  2. BTW Jamie, eating cholesterol has very little affect on your cholesterol levels. The more cholesterol you eat your body adjusts down the cholesterol level it makes to compensate. And your body makes way more cholesterol per day than we could eat.

    Interesting listtle facts : -)

    And I love eggs – I eat them almost every day.

  3. Excellent post.

    I must start storing mine in the fridge!

    We have friends who have their own chickens and they are far better that the eggs you get in the supermarket. I have a poached egg over toast every morning – absolutely love’em and their very nutritious.

  4. Thanks so much for this interesting blog on eggs. I have 2 eggs and a yogurt for lunch everyday and my doggie gets one too! I could live on them!

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